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BROOKLYN BOXER HOSTS FIGHT CARD AT MCU PARK

It was a real diamond ring.

MCU Park played host to a different kind of sporting event on Aug. 25, as the boxing ring took over the baseball field. Local boxing star-turned-promoter Dmitry Salita brought his Star of David Promotions’ Brooklyn Brawl series back with a 10-fight card that he said looked good against the Coney Island backdrop.

“It’s hard to describe in words,” said Salita, a former number-one contender in the junior welterweight division. “To see the ocean and the Cyclone in the background. It was very scenic.”

The night’s main event featured Cornelius Lock, originally from Detroit but now fighting out of Brooklyn, against Armenian-Belgian Alexander Miskirtchian. Lock came into the fight the underdog, but walked out of park with a third-round victory by way of technical knockout.

An earlier fight on the card featured Kazakhstanian-born Marine Park resident Bakhtiyar Eyubov winning with a knockout. Eyubov improved to 8–0 with his eighth knockout victory, taking out Cory Vom Baur in the second round. Salita said featuring local fighters was a focal point of his promotion, and a way of giving back to the local boxing scene that helped him become the man he is today.

“I grew up in Brooklyn and my whole boxing education happened in Brooklyn,” Salita said. “A tree grows in Brooklyn, and so do world champions.”

Salita started Star of David Promotions in 2010, and he took a big step in June, when he presented a card with Brooklyn Sports and Entertainment, the company behind the Barclays Center, at the Paramount Theater.

But Salita, 33, is not officially retired from the ring, although it has been nearly two years since his last fight —which was the second loss of his career. Salita is not sure when he will fight again, but he has not stopped training.

“I’m training and we’ll see what opportunities come up,” said Salita. “Promoting and everything is challenging, but fighting in the ring is the hardest thing.”

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